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Suprising Uses of Dudu Osun Soap

Hi all,

On to the story for today. I needed to wash my make-up brushes (which we should all do. Check my post out here on why). I did postpone this however because I felt I needed a special cleaning fluid or something to get them clean. I then had a light bulb moment AKA an “ah ha” moment.

The times I’ve previously used Dudu Osun on my face (which is now very infrequently as I’ve found it to be a bit too strong for my face) it removes every single trace of make-up. Literally every single thing. No mascara, eyeliner, nothing. I then thought if it could do such a good job on my face, how much more my make-up brushes.

Conclusion = It .was. amazing.

My brushes haven’t been cleaner and I exaggerate not. I wish I had taken before and after shots of the brushes. This idea has therefore brought about this post.

So in no particular order, what are some not too typical uses of Dudu Osun (or just any brand of black soap) soap.

  1. Cleaning your face

This isn’t a contradiction. It is still a great cleanser, just a very strong one. But it will rid your skin of any make up and is 100% natural, a great bonus

  1. Cleaning your body

This is my favourite use by far. I love the earthy smell, the lather and I love that I feel “clean” afterwards. Please note the suds are brown (because the soap is brown and not actually black). This can stain your bath/shower.

  1. Washing your make up brushes

I wet the soap. I then wet my brushes and swiped them across the soap two or three times. I then worked the soap into the brush head on my palm. The colour of the suds while doing this proves how good it is at getting the make-up off. Then proceed to rinsing the brushes afterwards with some water then leave them to dry.

  1. Washing your hair

Dudu Osun soap is a great alternative to shampoo. When I do use it, I like to just rub the bar of soap across my scalp. Having your hair parted can be quite helpful. I then proceed to work the soap into my scalp, as you would with normal shampoo. Then rinse your hair as normal.

  1. As a shaving cream/lotion

I am not a regular shaver as epilating is my preferred hair removal method. The few times when a shave is required, Dudu Osun is a very good shaving cream lotion. I will simply wet the bar of soap and lather it up between my hands. I will then spread the soap lather on the part that requires a shave (usually the legs). I will then proceed to shave carefully and voila!

The packaging of Dudu Osun has changed slightly and the soap now comes wrapped a little plastic wrap. This did also list some interesting uses so I took a picture and added it in below. It, unfortunately, does not provide instructions on how to use the soap for these great suggestions.

I still use Dudu Osun but have been trying out a few other brands of black soap. Admittedly they don’t differ a great deal and still do the same job.

Have you used Dudu Osun or any other black soap for any of the purposes suggested below? Let me know.

Until next time,

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl

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African Immigrants and a Dying Culture

I am a second generation African immigrant. That means my mum and dad are the first generation of Africans (in my family anyway) to emigrate from their home country. Being a second generation African is not unique to me and is the story of several other people in and around my age bracket, the “millennial” generation. I do feel that being a 2nd generation African puts me (and others in my position) in a somewhat precarious situation.

I identify with being a Nigerian of Yoruba origin. I understand however I might not be able to completely fit in with my fellow people given the fact I haven’t grown up in Nigeria.

I also identify with being British given that I was born here and have grown up here. I do know however that to the average third generational English man or woman, (although I may be born here) I’m not really British. It’s a question I’m often asked at work, “Where do you REALLY come from?”👀

Where do I fit? As I thought about this question I realised a lot of people are faced with same question. It may be you are from different parts of the country I.e. Your mother is from Delta state and your dad is from Ogun state (both in Nigeria). It may be a continental thing I.e. your mum is from Ghana and Dad is from South Africa. It may be an emigration thing (my example fits here).

Can we really identify with a particular culture? Is it being born in a specific place that makes you a member of that culture or your ancestry? Now we can trace our ancestry with a simple swab test. Surprisingly enough – most people are not 100% of anything in particular anyway, which makes things EVEN more confusing.

I watched this video and it was eye-opening. I haven’t reached a conclusion yet, still thinking it over. What do you think?

Until next time

Memoirs of a Yoruba Girl

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