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Suprising Uses of Dudu Osun Soap

Hi all,

On to the story for today. I needed to wash my make-up brushes (which we should all do. Check my post out here on why). I did postpone this however because I felt I needed a special cleaning fluid or something to get them clean. I then had a light bulb moment AKA an “ah ha” moment.

The times I’ve previously used Dudu Osun on my face (which is now very infrequently as I’ve found it to be a bit too strong for my face) it removes every single trace of make-up. Literally every single thing. No mascara, eyeliner, nothing. I then thought if it could do such a good job on my face, how much more my make-up brushes.

Conclusion = It .was. amazing.

My brushes haven’t been cleaner and I exaggerate not. I wish I had taken before and after shots of the brushes. This idea has therefore brought about this post.

So in no particular order, what are some not too typical uses of Dudu Osun (or just any brand of black soap) soap.

  1. Cleaning your face

This isn’t a contradiction. It is still a great cleanser, just a very strong one. But it will rid your skin of any make up and is 100% natural, a great bonus

  1. Cleaning your body

This is my favourite use by far. I love the earthy smell, the lather and I love that I feel “clean” afterwards. Please note the suds are brown (because the soap is brown and not actually black). This can stain your bath/shower.

  1. Washing your make up brushes

I wet the soap. I then wet my brushes and swiped them across the soap two or three times. I then worked the soap into the brush head on my palm. The colour of the suds while doing this proves how good it is at getting the make-up off. Then proceed to rinsing the brushes afterwards with some water then leave them to dry.

  1. Washing your hair

Dudu Osun soap is a great alternative to shampoo. When I do use it, I like to just rub the bar of soap across my scalp. Having your hair parted can be quite helpful. I then proceed to work the soap into my scalp, as you would with normal shampoo. Then rinse your hair as normal.

  1. As a shaving cream/lotion

I am not a regular shaver as epilating is my preferred hair removal method. The few times when a shave is required, Dudu Osun is a very good shaving cream lotion. I will simply wet the bar of soap and lather it up between my hands. I will then spread the soap lather on the part that requires a shave (usually the legs). I will then proceed to shave carefully and voila!

The packaging of Dudu Osun has changed slightly and the soap now comes wrapped a little plastic wrap. This did also list some interesting uses so I took a picture and added it in below. It, unfortunately, does not provide instructions on how to use the soap for these great suggestions.

I still use Dudu Osun but have been trying out a few other brands of black soap. Admittedly they don’t differ a great deal and still do the same job.

Have you used Dudu Osun or any other black soap for any of the purposes suggested below? Let me know.

Until next time,

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl

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Are Africans Losing Their Culture?

Hi all

I was recently watching a video on YouTube by Tunde Kelani (who by the way makes some of the best Yoruba movies I’ve watched). He was speaking to Olamide about his song titled “Bobo” (a pretty good song if you wondered).

In the interview, Olamide was talking about wanting to celebrate the Yoruba Culture and celebrate the language and this was why he only sung in Yoruba. I noticed that as he and Tunde Kelani continued conversating, he would mix English words along with Yoruba words.

That made me think about how diluted conversational Yoruba has become. Looking inwardly, I notice it can be personally difficult to continue a full conversation in Yoruba without the use of some English words.

Growing up within the Yoruba culture has helped me understand how deep of a language it is. Yoruba has become diluted to the point that I hear words I’ve never heard before that are for use in day to day conversation. I wonder if this is in anyway related to colonisation of Nigeria. If this is as a result of colonisation, other colony countries will have similar problems.That is another topic altogether.

Just my thoughts, what do you think?
Until next time
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A Personal Vent On Domestic Abuse in Nigerian Culture

This is a personal vent. I’m sure people may agree or disagree but I am entitled to my personal opinion which I have decided to share.

Nigeria has one of the highest rates of domestic violence in Africa. More than two thirds of Nigerian women are believed to experience physical, sexual and psychological abuse at the hands of their husbands. (Lifted from this website: http://www.havenrefuge.org.uk/index.php/about-the-haven/international-projects/nigeria)

I keep hearing stories of woman who died at the hands of an abusive husband. I’m only aware of this in Nigerian culture but I am sure this will happen in other cultures too.

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In the Nigerian culture, it seems rampant that females who are suffering from domestic abuse are always encouraged (especially by pastors or those in spiritual authority) to stay with their abusive husbands because God will change him and God doesn’t like divorce. I totally believe God can change anybody and I am not an advocate for divorce on any account. The bible doesn’t document any support of divorce apart from if either of the partners commit adultery. What I don’t agree with is encouraging a woman who being abused by her husband to stay with him and endure beating after beating and continue praying and never consider leaving. People that offer that kind of advice to people have no heart whatsoever. If it was your daughter or a member of your own family on the receiving end of blows from her husband, I don’t believe you would encourage her to stay there and continue to receive abuse. You would likely go there and pick her up yourself.

The people who are being abused can very well end up DYING and leaving their children with no mother. If not to that extreme, the children may see their mother being hurt by their father and this can start a vicious cycle in children who are moulded by what they see. I’m not married so I may not understand how it is but what I do know is that either as a married person or a single person, every one has the right to live without fear of being harmed or hurt by someone that is meant to love them. If anything or anyone is challenging that right, I believe you need to leave, for the sake of your life and your safety.

Is a person that can lay their hand on you worth dying for? Definitely not. Jesus did however already die for that person so get yourself safe and pray that God will change them. You can’t change them and staying to receive beatings will definitely not change them. God is the only one that can change someone anyway.

That’s my two pence. I find it so sad to hear a woman stayed with an abusive husband to “make it work”. From the first time he hit you, making it work shouldn’t be what you were thinking. Saving your life should be what you are thinking. A quick Google search will show how serious this has become.

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2012/may/22/domestic-violence-west-africa-irc

Until Next Time

Memoirs of a Yoruba Girl

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