Blog Archives

Jollof Rice – The Origins

image

Jollof Rice is hands down THE most popular West African rice dish for a number of reasons. It is a delicious tomato, bell pepper, onion and scotch bonnet based rice dish. It can be served with a number of equally delicous sides including chicken, fish, fried plantain. I think Jollof rice is always best washed down with a chilled bottle of supermalt.

image

West Africans will know well that the origins of jollof Rice is hotly debated, especially between Nigerians and Ghanaians.

image

image

image

Personally being of the Nigerian variety (Yoruba to be precise 😉) I think Nigerian Jollof is obviously the best. I’m sure

Jollof however is not an indigenous Nigerian name (at least not a Yoruba name) which would cause me to conclude it was not originally a Nigerian dish.

A little bit of research on the name Jollof  reveals it is related to The Wolof people who are an ethnic group in Senegal, The Gambia, and Mauritania. The term Wolof also refers to the Wolof language and to their states, cultures, and traditions. Older French publications frequently employ the spelling “Ouolof“; up to the 19th century, the spellings “Volof” and “Olof” are also encountered. In English, Wollof and Woloff are found, particularly in reference to the Gambian Wolof. (The spelling “Wollof” is closer to the native pronunciation of the name.) The spelling Jolof is often used, but in particular reference to the Wolof empire and kingdom in central Senegal that existed from the 14th to the 19th centuries.

image

So Jollof rice does not indigenously belong to either Nigerians or Ghanaians but actually the Wolof people of Gambia or Senegal. We can conclude and agree that although Nigerians are not the originators of Jollof Rice, they are instrumental in the perfecting of the dish 😃.

image

image

Until next time
Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
X

Advertisements

That Time I Went To Nigeria (Part 2)

Hey everyone

Hope you’ve enjoyed my experience so far. Please enjoy part two!

Day 7
Party Time! The party was in my village called Oke Odan in Ogun State. After packing all the food , we all got dressed and headed towards the venue.

image

I was privileged to visit my grandmother and grandfathers grave (on my mother’s side). I was privileged to meet both my grandmothers but never met either of my grandfathers :-(.

After the party, someone kindly gave my parents the gift of a LIVE TURKEY. The only issue is that we had to travel home (about an hour’s journey) with a noisy and really big turkey. Needless to say I could not relax.

image

The turkey was pretty big, minus the tail part. As we were driving, the bumps of the road would get the turkey aggravated, causing it to squak and flap loudly. It did nap for some of the journey as well. Prior to this, I had only seen turkeys on TV and on a plate at Christmas.

Unfortunately for me, we were stuck in traffic for over an hour and a half and things came to a completely standstill. So I was trapped in the car with the crazy turkey in the boot, 😦 o dear. The traffic was supposedly started by a goods vehicle that felt like going a different way to what road signage showed, causing us to be stuck and moving very little.

After we were able to move, my mum’s brother decided to take the turkey home = Freedom! We got in about 12pm or so after leaving at about 6/7pm.

Day 9
I’m not sure if this event occured on day 9 of my trip but the incident is VIVID in mind. As you already know, it was the rainy season during my stay. We headed out to visit some family members. Driving was ok, some of the roads were in a bit of a state but we carried on. Until we were driving in puddles that were almost reaching the passenger window in the car!! I was on the edge of my seat and was thanking God profusely that we didnt get flooded in the car.

My other experiences during my stay
The top of the list is NEPA! Everyone complains about Nepa, with good reason. During our stay, most times there would be electricity all through the night and then mid morning, the electricity would go. This meant a lot of the time we would be reliant on a generator. The generator runs on petrol/diesel and powers things up when Nepa isn’t working.

Some pictures of my stay
image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

In case you didn’t guess, I had an AMAZING time. I love going to Nigeria and feel lucky to visit even if it’s not as often as I would like. I feel privileged to be from a country that is so rich in culture and has such a great diversity of people. Admittedly, there are quite a few things I would like to change but we always thank God for progress. I will admit, visiting can be a bit of a culture shock and takes some getting used to but as the saying goes, “There’s no place like home”

Thanks for reading,
Until next time

MemoirsOfAYorubaGirl
X

%d bloggers like this: