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If you are Nigerian, you are probably going to have twins πŸ™‹

Did you know that Nigerians are more likely than anyone else to have twins? More specifically, Yoruba women are most likely to have twins, especially if you come from a town called Igbo-Ora where “three sets of twins were born in every 19 births” giving them the highest birth rate of twins in the entire world.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/2253845.stm
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2840794/

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This high occurrence is argued to be due to the amount of yams that Yoruba people like to eat. Yams contain phytoestrogen which is supposed to encourage the release of several eggs by the woman’s ovaries at the same time.

It is such a regular occurrence in Yoruba culture, we have names, specially designated for twins. Hence why we have the beautiful names Taiwo and Kehinde. I actually love these names because they are just rich in heritage, culture and meaning. And the names are also very close to home for me (hi mum πŸ™‹)

Taiwo or taiye wo literally means let me taste life. Kehinde or keyin de literally means came last or came afterward. In the specific context, it means coming after the first twin. These names as their meanings show are given to babies in order of when they are born. The first born of twins will bear the the name Taiwo and the second born will bear the name Kehinde. Story has it that Kehinde is the bossy of the two twins and forced the first twin, Taiwo to taste life first to decide if it was good for her to come out after. So Kehinde is actually the older as she sent her younger sibling on an errand. As Yorubas know, an unspoken right of being the older sibling is that you send your younger siblings on errands.

So if you’re Yoruba, you potentially have twins to look forward to. I love Yoruba culture, is it obvious? πŸ˜…

Until Next Time
Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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Are Africans Losing Their Culture?

Hi all

I was recently watching a video on YouTube by Tunde Kelani (who by the way makes some of the best Yoruba movies I’ve watched). He was speaking to Olamide about his song titled “Bobo” (a pretty good song if you wondered).

In the interview, Olamide was talking about wanting to celebrate the Yoruba Culture and celebrate the language and this was why he only sung in Yoruba. I noticed that as he and Tunde Kelani continued conversating, he would mix English words along with Yoruba words.

That made me think about how diluted conversational Yoruba has become. Looking inwardly, I notice it can be personally difficult to continue a full conversation in Yoruba without the use of some English words.

Growing up within the Yoruba culture has helped me understand how deep of a language it is. Yoruba has become diluted to the point that I hear words I’ve never heard before that are for use in day to day conversation. I wonder if this is in anyway related to colonisation of Nigeria. If this is as a result of colonisation, other colony countries will have similar problems.That is another topic altogether.

Just my thoughts, what do you think?
Until next time
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That Time I Went To Nigeria (Part 2)

Hey everyone

Hope you’ve enjoyed my experience so far. Please enjoy part two!

Day 7
Party Time! The party was in my village called Oke Odan in Ogun State. After packing all the food , we all got dressed and headed towards the venue.

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I was privileged to visit my grandmother and grandfathers grave (on my mother’s side). I was privileged to meet both my grandmothers but never met either of my grandfathers :-(.

After the party, someone kindly gave my parents the gift of a LIVE TURKEY. The only issue is that we had to travel home (about an hour’s journey) with a noisy and really big turkey. Needless to say I could not relax.

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The turkey was pretty big, minus the tail part. As we were driving, the bumps of the road would get the turkey aggravated, causing it to squak and flap loudly. It did nap for some of the journey as well. Prior to this, I had only seen turkeys on TV and on a plate at Christmas.

Unfortunately for me, we were stuck in traffic for over an hour and a half and things came to a completely standstill. So I was trapped in the car with the crazy turkey in the boot, 😦 o dear. The traffic was supposedly started by a goods vehicle that felt like going a different way to what road signage showed, causing us to be stuck and moving very little.

After we were able to move, my mum’s brother decided to take the turkey home = Freedom! We got in about 12pm or so after leaving at about 6/7pm.

Day 9
I’m not sure if this event occured on day 9 of my trip but the incident is VIVID in mind. As you already know, it was the rainy season during my stay. We headed out to visit some family members. Driving was ok, some of the roads were in a bit of a state but we carried on. Until we were driving in puddles that were almost reaching the passenger window in the car!! I was on the edge of my seat and was thanking God profusely that we didnt get flooded in the car.

My other experiences during my stay
The top of the list is NEPA! Everyone complains about Nepa, with good reason. During our stay, most times there would be electricity all through the night and then mid morning, the electricity would go. This meant a lot of the time we would be reliant on a generator. The generator runs on petrol/diesel and powers things up when Nepa isn’t working.

Some pictures of my stay
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In case you didn’t guess, I had an AMAZING time. I love going to Nigeria and feel lucky to visit even if it’s not as often as I would like. I feel privileged to be from a country that is so rich in culture and has such a great diversity of people. Admittedly, there are quite a few things I would like to change but we always thank God for progress. I will admit, visiting can be a bit of a culture shock and takes some getting used to but as the saying goes, “There’s no place like home”

Thanks for reading,
Until next time

MemoirsOfAYorubaGirl
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