Blog Archives

Say My Name!

I attended an amazing conference some months ago and the issue of names came up. The point being raised was that your name is your identity and it deserved to be pronounced properly.

After hearing the statement and processing it, I realised I had gotten comfortable with incorrect pronunciation of my name, literally for as long as I could remember. I’m sure many Africans can relate with an official phone call to the house and the person on the other line stumbling at the pronunciation of your name until they manage to offer one that bears a vague type of resemblance to your original name. Or having a supply teacher at school that would insist on calling everyone by their first and last names. Till this day I struggle to understand why this was necessary. Those with foreign sounding names would be subjected to a teacher butchering their name while the other classmates had a giggle at your expense. I wonder if this why we have just come to accept that bad pronunciation of names is ok? Sometimes the hassle of correcting the incorrect pronunciation seems so great that we accept the wrong one so we can quickly leave behind the very embarrassing situation.

In my experience, a lot of Africans (and other races too) accept really poor pronunciations of their names to make things easier for other people. I have also definitely accepted the lie that people not from where I’m from could not pronounce my name properly. The conference I attended helped me to understand what a big lie that is.

There are a plethora of foreign and non English names that are regularly pronounced correctly without struggle. So how hard is your Nigerian name? Your Igbo, Yoruba or Hausa name?

I’ve become so used to pronouncing my name wrongly that I will say it before even realising what I said. It’s something I will continue to work on

Until next time,

Memoirs of a Yoruba girl



Suprising Uses of Dudu Osun Soap

Hi all,

On to the story for today. I needed to wash my make-up brushes (which we should all do. Check my post out here on why). I did postpone this however because I felt I needed a special cleaning fluid or something to get them clean. I then had a light bulb moment AKA an “ah ha” moment.

The times I’ve previously used Dudu Osun on my face (which is now very infrequently as I’ve found it to be a bit too strong for my face) it removes every single trace of make-up. Literally every single thing. No mascara, eyeliner, nothing. I then thought if it could do such a good job on my face, how much more my make-up brushes.

Conclusion = It .was. amazing.

My brushes haven’t been cleaner and I exaggerate not. I wish I had taken before and after shots of the brushes. This idea has therefore brought about this post.

So in no particular order, what are some not too typical uses of Dudu Osun (or just any brand of black soap) soap.

  1. Cleaning your face

This isn’t a contradiction. It is still a great cleanser, just a very strong one. But it will rid your skin of any make up and is 100% natural, a great bonus

  1. Cleaning your body

This is my favourite use by far. I love the earthy smell, the lather and I love that I feel “clean” afterwards. Please note the suds are brown (because the soap is brown and not actually black). This can stain your bath/shower.

  1. Washing your make up brushes

I wet the soap. I then wet my brushes and swiped them across the soap two or three times. I then worked the soap into the brush head on my palm. The colour of the suds while doing this proves how good it is at getting the make-up off. Then proceed to rinsing the brushes afterwards with some water then leave them to dry.

  1. Washing your hair

Dudu Osun soap is a great alternative to shampoo. When I do use it, I like to just rub the bar of soap across my scalp. Having your hair parted can be quite helpful. I then proceed to work the soap into my scalp, as you would with normal shampoo. Then rinse your hair as normal.

  1. As a shaving cream/lotion

I am not a regular shaver as epilating is my preferred hair removal method. The few times when a shave is required, Dudu Osun is a very good shaving cream lotion. I will simply wet the bar of soap and lather it up between my hands. I will then spread the soap lather on the part that requires a shave (usually the legs). I will then proceed to shave carefully and voila!

The packaging of Dudu Osun has changed slightly and the soap now comes wrapped a little plastic wrap. This did also list some interesting uses so I took a picture and added it in below. It, unfortunately, does not provide instructions on how to use the soap for these great suggestions.

I still use Dudu Osun but have been trying out a few other brands of black soap. Admittedly they don’t differ a great deal and still do the same job.

Have you used Dudu Osun or any other black soap for any of the purposes suggested below? Let me know.

Until next time,

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl


Things I Hate About Being Late 

This topic right here, it is slyly the story of my life.  I think a lot of people (especially black people) can relate to this. I have racked my brain for a starting point or a particular event that has brought about about such a lax attitude to punctuality and unfortunately I can’t think of one.

This post was inspired by this video I watched on YouTube. I’ve linked it below ⬇

So in no particular order, here are some of the things I hate about being late;

1. Having to prepare a credible argument/excuse for why you are late – this is figured out while still on the way to the destination. Excuses may range from oversleeping, to missing the bus, traffic on the way or another valid excuse.

2. Missing the beginning of the event – especially when it’s an event you have been looking forward to. For me this used to be the praise and worship part of the Sunday church service at my church at university. I LOVE praise and worship and hated missing it (obviously not enough though or I would have been earlier)

3. Sprinting/power walking to catch the train or other mode of transport to get to where you are trying to be – you give it your all to catch the said mode of transport, especially the train/bus that will help you scrap “on time”. If you miss it, there is no hope for even scraping on time.

4. Trying to cram the morning routine into 5/10 minutes – this tends to happen after oversleeping or when the alarm doesn’t go off. The morning routine which would normally take 30/45 minutes is crammed into 5/10 minutes. This is not an easy thing to do and involves aspects of the routine being omitted or being done on the way to the destination.

5. Feeling bad as you give yourself a telling off for being late AGAIN – you always scold yourself that it will not repeat itself again. Until the next time….

6. The knowing stares when you have to walk into an event late – especially when everyone else was on time. In these situations, it is advisable to perch QUIETLY at the back of the room to remain as inconspicuous as possible.

7. Having notoriety among friends for being repeatedly late 

9. Feeling a great sense of achievement when you FINALLY get to a place early or on time – it is possible. Takes a lot of planning but it is definitely possible.

Can you think of any more? Share them below

Until next time 

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl 


Book of the Month (March 2017)

When this book was first released, it was surrounded by a lot of buzz and still is. I was curious about the life and story of Toke Makinwa so I decided to read the story. The book for the month of March 2017 is On Becoming by Toke Makinwa.

 Credit to Linda Ikeji’s blog for the image

Credit to Amazon for this image 


The book is a biography about Toke Makinwa’s life up to this point. She talks about her life experiences from childhood, the tragic loss of her parents and  the breakdown of her very famous and public marriage. She uses her story to share key lessons on life and relationships in a candid way.

The Book’s Description

Toke never envisaged that she would be a successful media personality. She began her journey as a bubbly child but grew into a lonely teenager after the devastating loss of both her parents. For so long after, it seemed as though she would never find herself.
On Becoming is the real Toke Makinwa telling us what it is like to be one of the most talked about celebrities in Nigeria. She reveals the truth behind her 14-year relationship with the man she finally married. A marriage that ended
in an atrocious scandal that nearly brought her to her knees.
In the wake of the peaks and troughs that characterise Toke’s experiences, she now shares her struggle with blinding betrayal, finding forgiveness and drawing strength from her faith in God.

On Becoming is Toke’s journey through pain to victory.


It was interesting to get to know a bit about the person behind the name. Toke Makinwa is a private person so although she is a socialite, there isn’t that much we know about her apart from the information she has made available about herself. I found the parts she shared about her childhood and about her parent’s very open and honest.

I also appreciated her honesty in sharing the things she did about her marriage relationship because some of the things she shared are things that are very private and people would often want to remain that way.


I would have liked to know more about her career journey to success.  As I touched on earlier, Toke Makinwa is someone that is private and only shares things about herself that she wishes to. I feel there would be a lot of useful knowledge to glean from her career story. Although she did touch on it very slightly when she talks about staying in London for some time, she doesn’t really explore this more.

At times, it felt it little like the story jumped from one topic to another, kind of losing us on the way there.


  1. Do not ignore the red flags! While reading Toke’s story, it became clear there were behavioural patterns that were repeatedly displayed by Maje.  It would have saved Toke a lot of heart ache had she have paid attention to the flags.
  2. Do unto others as you would have them do to you – from Toke’s account of her experience, it doesn’t appear as though Maje considered Toke’s feelings much. I am apprehensive to completely say that because there are always two sides to a story and we have not heard Maje’s side. It may completely flip the script.
  3. Love is powerful and very addictive – love clearly can make a person do things they wouldn’t have dreamt possible. Toke shares how she started using creams to lighten her skin to make her appeal more to her then spouse
  4. In the multitude of counsellors there is safety – Toke shares that a number of people warned her about her relationship with Maje and went as far as to say even his own sister warned her. There is definitely truth to the scripture in Proverbs 11:14.


Hope you enjoyed my review; do let me know if you read it yourself

Until next time

Memoirs of a Yoruba Girl

Ode to the public transport “blocker”

Hi all 

I wrote this short poem for the days we travel on public transport and there is the unrelenting commuter that insists on blocking everyone’s path.  If you can relate, this one is for you. (Side note: “ode” in the context of this post is “a lyric poem, typically one in the form of an address to a particular subject, written in varied or irregular metre” and NOT ode in the Yoruba language, used as an insult 😅)

Dear passenger,

We all have somewhere to be 

Please tell me why you are blocking me?

I understand you don’t know your way

However understand this is neither the time nor day 

Members of staff are available to help 

So please be kind enough to keep to the left 

All I want today is a smooth journey 

So I may arrive at my destination early

When you stand in the middle of the walking path you see 

You block the flow of movement for everyone  (including me)

So please be considerate of what you are doing 

And keep to the left so we can all keep moving

Please believe I wrote this in about 5 minutes  (I’m shocked too!)

Until next time 

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl 

Not everyday DIY 

Happy new year 

Hope christmas and new years celebrations have been enjoyable and a fun time with family.

I am the biggest DIY advocate ever. In the era of YouTube and Google, what do you need a professional for? I have used YouTube for a number of things most especially related to hair. That includes styling, reviews, tutorials and a host of other things.

That was until I went for a professional hair consultation. I learnt so much in the few hours I was with the hair consultant I saw. Although she told me a number of things I already knew, because I saw her, she could actually look at my hair and assess it in a way I just couldn’t have done alone. 

This I guess may not be applicable to everyone as some people are more hands on than others but we can’t be experts in  everything. It’s impossible to be equally good at everything. The focus, time and practice it will take to be a pro in one particular area cannot be replicated for all other areas. It’s actually impossible 🙄. Why not then go to see someone who has the expertise in the area you are not so strong. Remember the saying “jack of all trades, master of none”. That being said I am still a DIY diehard, but I’m not afraid to ask for help.

Until next time 

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl 

Damilola Taylor, “Our Loved Boy” BBC programme review

I vividly remember around the time that Damilola Taylor passed away. I remember going to bed and laying on the top bunk of my bunk bed in the dark at about 10 years old and being able to not comprehend what had really happened. It was scary to think of someone so young dying that way. Damilola Taylor was born in 1989 and would have been only a little older than me.

Damilola Taylor was a few weeks shy of his 11th birthday when he was murdered in a completely unprovoked attack.  Even till today, it is still heartbreaking to think about what he went through.

So I was understandably interested to watch the show and learn more about Damilola Taylor before he came over to the UK.

The programme was based on the true life events that facilitated Damilola Taylor’s coming to the U.K and the events that happened after his demise.

My review 
I loved that they were able to bring some joy out of what remains a sad situation and I appreciated they allowed us to get to know who Damilola actually was. He was a dreamer and had high hopes for his future. The actor that played Damilola, Sammy Kamara brought out his playful and childish side excellently because that was what he was, a child. He did an amazing job of bringing his character to life, I felt I was able to actually get to know who Damilola was a little better. 

The actors chosen to play both Damilola and his family all did a great job of helping us to see a little into the Taylor family’s world, especially after loosing their son. I feel I was able to gain a bit more insight about them and the reasons they chose for bringing their family to the UK.

The most heart wrenching scene of the programme I felt was the phone call made by Damilola’s older brother Tunde to his father to break the news to him. The silence and the tears spoke great volumes. It was amazing acting on both parts and spoke of the great strength both of them had in the face of  great grief.

I appreciated the programme didn’t paint the family to be angels but allowed us to get a realistic picture of who they really were and the very really struggles they  would have gone through as a family trying to come to terms with loosing a loved one.

It is also great to know Damilola’s family decided to keep his legacy alive through the Damilola Taylor Community Centre. My prayer for the Taylor family is that God will heal their hearts and give them His peace.

Until next time 

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl 

Christianity – The Nigerian Way 

​Hi all

I’ve been privileged to be a part of an African church for several years. I must say that no two days are the same and there is always something to make you giggle, always. Below I’ve shared just some of the unique things about attending or growing up in an African church

1.Hymns are subject to various types of remixes – hymns are usually quite sombre songs but I have heard hymns on the keyboard, with a talking drum, with beats and on the saxophone – and all suprisingly quite good too.

2. Any excuse to dance is welcomed with open arms – during the offering, if the pastor wants a dance session, if someone is bringing their new baby to church, if someone has a testimony, the list goes on

3. “Offering time = blessing time”, “Testimony time =blessing time”, “up up Jesus = down down satan” are some of the more popular phrases that everyone knows.

4. The service is liable to run over stated time once in a while

5. You don’t really need a background in music to join the music ministry – all you need is a willing heart and a voice (whatever it sounds like)

6. New years eve aka crossover night is mandatorily spent at church 

7. Sunday service requires your Sunday best – so best outfit, shoes, hair, make up, only the best for God’s house 

8. Testimony givers will most likely sing a song unless warned otherwise 

9. Attending an African church gives you non biological mandatory family who will expect invitations to all major life events 

10. Mum or dad making a night vigil compulsory is pretty much iron clad – whether or not you feel like it or not 

11. Special church occasions mean Jollof Rice,  fried rice, cake, drinks or all of the above 

12. The service always ends with “the grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God…..” always.

These are the few I can think of. Do you have any other ones? Share them below!
Until next time 

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl 

Jollof Rice – The Origins


Jollof Rice is hands down THE most popular West African rice dish for a number of reasons. It is a delicious tomato, bell pepper, onion and scotch bonnet based rice dish. It can be served with a number of equally delicous sides including chicken, fish, fried plantain. I think Jollof rice is always best washed down with a chilled bottle of supermalt.


West Africans will know well that the origins of jollof Rice is hotly debated, especially between Nigerians and Ghanaians.




Personally being of the Nigerian variety (Yoruba to be precise 😉) I think Nigerian Jollof is obviously the best. I’m sure

Jollof however is not an indigenous Nigerian name (at least not a Yoruba name) which would cause me to conclude it was not originally a Nigerian dish.

A little bit of research on the name Jollof  reveals it is related to The Wolof people who are an ethnic group in Senegal, The Gambia, and Mauritania. The term Wolof also refers to the Wolof language and to their states, cultures, and traditions. Older French publications frequently employ the spelling “Ouolof“; up to the 19th century, the spellings “Volof” and “Olof” are also encountered. In English, Wollof and Woloff are found, particularly in reference to the Gambian Wolof. (The spelling “Wollof” is closer to the native pronunciation of the name.) The spelling Jolof is often used, but in particular reference to the Wolof empire and kingdom in central Senegal that existed from the 14th to the 19th centuries.


So Jollof rice does not indigenously belong to either Nigerians or Ghanaians but actually the Wolof people of Gambia or Senegal. We can conclude and agree that although Nigerians are not the originators of Jollof Rice, they are instrumental in the perfecting of the dish 😃.



Until next time
Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl

The Blog Tag!

Hey everyone

I was kindly nominated for the “blog tag” by Natalie of PursueInspire

Are you named after someone? Not someone I personally know but I am named after Queen Esther in the bible.

When was the last time you cried? I can’t pinpoint exactly but maybe a week or two ago, watching the news on Israel and Palestine 😦

Do you have any children? Nope, no children yet.

If you were another person would you be a friend of yourself? Yes I think I would. I think I’m a good friend :-p

Do you have any guilty pleasures? I have a sugar addiction. I have been fighting to give up chocolate, it’s an ongoing battle.

Do you like handwriting? Yes, it can be quicker that starting up the laptop and handwriting has more character.

What’s your favourite cereal? I can’t really remember as I don’t really ever eat cereal. I like porridge and Belvita biscuits through I have now given them up 😦

What’s the first thing you notice about people? Their hair, the way they are dressed and their shoes.

What’s the colour of your eyes? Dark brown

Scary movies or happy endings? Happy endings all the time. I like to feel happy, inspired and ready to conquer the world after watching a film

Favourite TV Show? There are a couple. Recently got into orange is the new black. I quite like new girl. Just started watching scandal and that is also looking rather good.

Winter or summer? Summer, sunshine and warmth over snow anytime (though I love snow)

Hugs or kisses? Hugs! 🙂

Special talent? I enjoy singing and I dabble in fiction writing and song writing.

Where were you born? East London, UK

Hobbies? Reading, shopping, listening to music and now the gym, LOL

Do you have any pets? Nope, had some goldfish when I was quite young but no pets after the goldfish died

Favourite movie(s)? That I can remember off the top of my head Coming to America, Madam Dearest (Nollywood Movie)

What colour is your car? The colour is pending, soon arriving, 🙂

What do you want to do when you grow up? I grown up and still growing up. I’m not totally decided to be honest, still giving it a good bit of thought

Ok, I nominate Trudy of Flash In Lites
And I nominate Kehinde of Perfectly Imperfect

Yours Always

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