Blog Archives

Timeless skincare tips 

Skincare is a riddle. Sometimes your skin is ever fleeky and other times it refuses to co-operate. I was having one of these non co-operation moments recently and so I decided to go back to skincare basics.

1. Wash your hands BEFORE they go anywhere near your face

I think we can sometimes forget how easy it is to pick up germs and grime on your hands. From touching the bus handle to picking up your phone on the floor, there are germs absolutely everywhere. It would be highly risky to then take those hands to your face. Who knows what kind of spots you may end up with?

2. Wash your face twice daily

Washing your face in the morning is to remove any sweat from your sleep and washing before bed is to remove any grime from the day. I would say washing your face before bed is of great importance.

3. Take off any makeup PROPERLY before bed

A makeup wipe alone doesn’t really cut it in my humble opinion. After reading an article where the woman used makeup wipes and checked her skin afterwards using some skin microscope or something, she noticed some of the wipes only moved the makeup around her face. A great makeup remover is coconut oil (will talk more about this later).

4. Regular face masks are benefical

Once or twice a week for a face mask is  a good amount. Regular face masks are a preventative thing by removing any deeply seated dirt, oil or whatever else. Keep in mind there are a whole host of face masks that deal with various things, so it may be wise to choose one that addresses your skin need at the time. 

5. Wash your makeup brushes 

Again for the same reason that grime can get stuck in things that are not regularly washed, your brushes can harbour germs and bacteria. When you now use those brushes to apply your make-up, you push germs deep into your skin, which may lead to very painful spots. I learnt the hard way that this is key.

6. See a professional 

I am a big advocate for professional help, especially if you’ve tried all you can. I blogged about it here. Professionals have been trained in this and so will have some knowledge you don’t. Professional facials are important too, I would recommend this every few months.

7. Drink water 

Water is one of those things we know to be good for us but we never get enough of. Water facilitates the process of detoxification in the body and so drinking plenty of water will help to ensure this process is not hindered.

Hope these tips are helpful

Until next time 

Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl 

Finishing every book you read  

If you’re a book reader like me,  you know the feeling when you read a book that resonates with you. Every word speaks to you (literally). They literally jump off the page. You feel like you can take over the world. Then by the next day, you can hardly remember what you read 😅. This is OK if it is a fictional story you are reading but for books that you want to impact you, or books you want to learn something from, that is not so helpful.

In no particular order, these are the tips I’ve found (and am still trialing) for getting the most out of non-fictional books I read.

  1. Choose the book – duh! Of course choose the book but I mean choose something that interests you. If you pick a book you don’t find interesting, you may struggle to finish it. Read the description, read reviews (Amazon is awesome for this)
  2. Takes notes – a search on Google gave some great ideas on how you can do this. You can have subheadings that match the chapter of each book and summarise into a few sentences what you’ve learnt. So when you come back to your notes, you can get an idea of what was impactful.
  3. Highlight key standout phrases – we are all wired differently and what will resonate with me may do nothing for you. They will resonate for a reason so highlight it so you can revisit it again.
  4. Read the book more than once – this is the real struggle. It’s great to finish a book you’ve enjoyed but then it’s not so enjoyable reading it again. Consider giving it a bit of time but read the book again, you may find there are things you missed the first time you were reading
  5. Action! – with what you’ve learnt, what are you going to do? If you take no action, you’re better off to have not wasted your time reading the book in the first place. The action may be a new lesson learnt, knowledge gained or an action taken but you should leave with something benefical.

      I hope you use these tips to change your life with some new books. Do you have any other ones? Add them below 

      Until next time 

      Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl 

      If you are Nigerian, you are probably going to have twins 🙋

      Did you know that Nigerians are more likely than anyone else to have twins? More specifically, Yoruba women are most likely to have twins, especially if you come from a town called Igbo-Ora where “three sets of twins were born in every 19 births” giving them the highest birth rate of twins in the entire world.
      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/2253845.stm
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2840794/

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      This high occurrence is argued to be due to the amount of yams that Yoruba people like to eat. Yams contain phytoestrogen which is supposed to encourage the release of several eggs by the woman’s ovaries at the same time.

      It is such a regular occurrence in Yoruba culture, we have names, specially designated for twins. Hence why we have the beautiful names Taiwo and Kehinde. I actually love these names because they are just rich in heritage, culture and meaning. And the names are also very close to home for me (hi mum 🙋)

      Taiwo or taiye wo literally means let me taste life. Kehinde or keyin de literally means came last or came afterward. In the specific context, it means coming after the first twin. These names as their meanings show are given to babies in order of when they are born. The first born of twins will bear the the name Taiwo and the second born will bear the name Kehinde. Story has it that Kehinde is the bossy of the two twins and forced the first twin, Taiwo to taste life first to decide if it was good for her to come out after. So Kehinde is actually the older as she sent her younger sibling on an errand. As Yorubas know, an unspoken right of being the older sibling is that you send your younger siblings on errands.

      So if you’re Yoruba, you potentially have twins to look forward to. I love Yoruba culture, is it obvious? 😅

      Until Next Time
      Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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      Jollof Rice – The Origins

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      Jollof Rice is hands down THE most popular West African rice dish for a number of reasons. It is a delicious tomato, bell pepper, onion and scotch bonnet based rice dish. It can be served with a number of equally delicous sides including chicken, fish, fried plantain. I think Jollof rice is always best washed down with a chilled bottle of supermalt.

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      West Africans will know well that the origins of jollof Rice is hotly debated, especially between Nigerians and Ghanaians.

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      Personally being of the Nigerian variety (Yoruba to be precise 😉) I think Nigerian Jollof is obviously the best. I’m sure

      Jollof however is not an indigenous Nigerian name (at least not a Yoruba name) which would cause me to conclude it was not originally a Nigerian dish.

      A little bit of research on the name Jollof  reveals it is related to The Wolof people who are an ethnic group in Senegal, The Gambia, and Mauritania. The term Wolof also refers to the Wolof language and to their states, cultures, and traditions. Older French publications frequently employ the spelling “Ouolof“; up to the 19th century, the spellings “Volof” and “Olof” are also encountered. In English, Wollof and Woloff are found, particularly in reference to the Gambian Wolof. (The spelling “Wollof” is closer to the native pronunciation of the name.) The spelling Jolof is often used, but in particular reference to the Wolof empire and kingdom in central Senegal that existed from the 14th to the 19th centuries.

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      So Jollof rice does not indigenously belong to either Nigerians or Ghanaians but actually the Wolof people of Gambia or Senegal. We can conclude and agree that although Nigerians are not the originators of Jollof Rice, they are instrumental in the perfecting of the dish 😃.

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      Until next time
      Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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      My Story is available for download!

      Hi all,

      I’m quite excited to write this post today. For anyone who may have had a look around the “Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl” blog, you will know I dabble in fictional writing from time to time.

      My writing journey started with a story on this blog with a post titled the “The Colour Red” in around 2011/2012. (Here’s the link in case you wanted to read it https://memoirsofayorubagirl.wordpress.com/2012/01/29/my-first-attempt-at-writing/?preview=true )

      At the start of 2015, I set myself a number of goals, one of which was to write a book. As the title indicates, the book now exists and is ready for download via Amazon Kindle. I hope and pray that by God’s grace, this will be the first of many.

      Please kindly pop along to the Amazon Website via the link below.

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      http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B018D9WAPC/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1448303561&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX110_SY165&keywords=esther+akorede

      Download, read, enjoy and give me your honest feedback. Most importantly, please share!

      Hoping to hear from you

      Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl

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      What is African Time?

      Hi everyone, hope this post meets you well.

      Wanted to touch on a very sensitive and controversial issue. Africans alike know it as African time, Caribbeans know it as Black man time (I believe) and I’ve heard Indians refer to it as Indian time. All the terms are a nice way to refer to the fact the we as Africans and Black people in general are intentionally late for events and have a overly relaxed attitude to punctuality.

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      It’s such a legitimate term it has its own dedicated Wikipedia page! “African time (or Africa time) is the perceived cultural tendency, in most parts of Africa, toward a more relaxed attitude to time. This is sometimes used in a pejorative sense, about tardiness in appointments, meetings and events. This also includes the more leisurely, relaxed, and less rigorously-scheduled lifestyle found in African countries, especially as opposed to the more clock-bound pace of daily life in Western countries. As such, it is similar to time orientations in some other non-Western culture regions”. (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_time)

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      The first place I noticed this was at African weddings and big scale functions. The invitation will state a certain time and nobody gets there at the stated time, even the celebrants! For example, a 50th birthday party is scheduled to start at 6pm. Guests may not properly begin to arrive until 7:30pm. The celebrant may be fashionably late and arrive at 8pm or 8:30pm.

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      Unfortunately what can happen is this “African time” mentality infiltrates all other areas of your life. Which translates to you just scraping being on time to work, school, college, university, church or interviews. It can mean you miss trains and buses you could have easily otherwise caught. It translates to you arriving late to parties and potentially your own wedding!

      I think the conclusion of the matter is discipline! (Admittedly I’m still working on this myself!)

      Until Next Time
      Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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      That Time I Went To Nigeria (Part 2)

      Hey everyone

      Hope you’ve enjoyed my experience so far. Please enjoy part two!

      Day 7
      Party Time! The party was in my village called Oke Odan in Ogun State. After packing all the food , we all got dressed and headed towards the venue.

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      I was privileged to visit my grandmother and grandfathers grave (on my mother’s side). I was privileged to meet both my grandmothers but never met either of my grandfathers :-(.

      After the party, someone kindly gave my parents the gift of a LIVE TURKEY. The only issue is that we had to travel home (about an hour’s journey) with a noisy and really big turkey. Needless to say I could not relax.

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      The turkey was pretty big, minus the tail part. As we were driving, the bumps of the road would get the turkey aggravated, causing it to squak and flap loudly. It did nap for some of the journey as well. Prior to this, I had only seen turkeys on TV and on a plate at Christmas.

      Unfortunately for me, we were stuck in traffic for over an hour and a half and things came to a completely standstill. So I was trapped in the car with the crazy turkey in the boot, 😦 o dear. The traffic was supposedly started by a goods vehicle that felt like going a different way to what road signage showed, causing us to be stuck and moving very little.

      After we were able to move, my mum’s brother decided to take the turkey home = Freedom! We got in about 12pm or so after leaving at about 6/7pm.

      Day 9
      I’m not sure if this event occured on day 9 of my trip but the incident is VIVID in mind. As you already know, it was the rainy season during my stay. We headed out to visit some family members. Driving was ok, some of the roads were in a bit of a state but we carried on. Until we were driving in puddles that were almost reaching the passenger window in the car!! I was on the edge of my seat and was thanking God profusely that we didnt get flooded in the car.

      My other experiences during my stay
      The top of the list is NEPA! Everyone complains about Nepa, with good reason. During our stay, most times there would be electricity all through the night and then mid morning, the electricity would go. This meant a lot of the time we would be reliant on a generator. The generator runs on petrol/diesel and powers things up when Nepa isn’t working.

      Some pictures of my stay
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      In case you didn’t guess, I had an AMAZING time. I love going to Nigeria and feel lucky to visit even if it’s not as often as I would like. I feel privileged to be from a country that is so rich in culture and has such a great diversity of people. Admittedly, there are quite a few things I would like to change but we always thank God for progress. I will admit, visiting can be a bit of a culture shock and takes some getting used to but as the saying goes, “There’s no place like home”

      Thanks for reading,
      Until next time

      MemoirsOfAYorubaGirl
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      Letter To My Childhood Sweetheart

      This is a letter to my childhood sweetheart. Read it to the end , I’m sure you’ll really like it.

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      Letter To My Childhood Sweetheart

      It was great seeing you today, after not seeing you for ages. It was amazing how you had changed , you looked older but you still looked youthful at the same time, I guess it’s a little hard to describe. I felt ashamed that you saw me the way I was, but you were never judgemental.
      I saw you walking down the street with a really pretty girl. You always had loads of friends even before we became friends.

      We’ve known each other as long as I can remember. My mum and dad knew your dad for a long time so we automatically became friends.
      You were my first and best play mate. We would spend hours playing in the streets , riding bikes and knocking doors. Mum and dad let you sleep over so many times, it was almost as if you lived with us. The sleepovers used to be so much fun. We would stay up all night telling stories and making each other laugh until our little tummies hurt. I thought we would be together forever. It was my new friends that came between us. It’s sad now I think about it. You wanted me to stay away from them, but I didnt want to hear any of it.

      Eventually, we just grew apart. We never spent time together anymore, I always cancelled on you last minute to do something else. The little time we did spend together was rushed and insincere on my part. I was a terrible friend. I knew you still really wanted to speak to me and see me, but I just didnt have the time anymore. I guess you wanted the old me back. Looking back, I guess I felt a bit guilty for treating you so badly was why I couldn’t admit I was wrong.

      I still always invited you to family functions because it would have been weird you not being there. You were always at my birthday parties, at Christmas parties, family BBQ’s and any other mundane family function. I guess you were like family to me. It did become more and more awkward though because all we would say was hi and bye. I could see in your eyes you wanted to say so much more but you never forced it. It was as if you were waiting on me to make up my mind.

      Church was your favourite. You made me love church and Sunday school. You always knew all the answers and you never wanted to go home. I guess because your dad was in charge of everything was why you loved going so much.

      I really regret how I treated you and seeing you brought back all the old feelings. All you ever wanted was to love me. You wanted to soothe away the stress of my day and whisper sweet nothings in my ears. But I never had the time.

      I realise now that I have always loved you. From the first time we played outside together, I knew I would always love you. You were and will always be my childhood sweetheart.

      You know about my husband, my kids and my job. I don’t know how my husband might feel about it but I guess I have to be true to my heart, whatever happens. Jesus Christ, lover of my soul, my childhood sweetheart, can we pick up from where we left off?

      Yours Truly,

      A old friend that really misses you
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      Hope you guys enjoyed that. The idea for this short letter came because I realise a lot of christians have known or known about Jesus for ages but have only developed meaningful relationships with him as they have grown up, a bit like a childhood sweetheart. Hope you enjoyed this. Let me know what you thought of it.

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      Until next time
      Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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      A Personal Vent On Domestic Abuse in Nigerian Culture

      This is a personal vent. I’m sure people may agree or disagree but I am entitled to my personal opinion which I have decided to share.

      Nigeria has one of the highest rates of domestic violence in Africa. More than two thirds of Nigerian women are believed to experience physical, sexual and psychological abuse at the hands of their husbands. (Lifted from this website: http://www.havenrefuge.org.uk/index.php/about-the-haven/international-projects/nigeria)

      I keep hearing stories of woman who died at the hands of an abusive husband. I’m only aware of this in Nigerian culture but I am sure this will happen in other cultures too.

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      In the Nigerian culture, it seems rampant that females who are suffering from domestic abuse are always encouraged (especially by pastors or those in spiritual authority) to stay with their abusive husbands because God will change him and God doesn’t like divorce. I totally believe God can change anybody and I am not an advocate for divorce on any account. The bible doesn’t document any support of divorce apart from if either of the partners commit adultery. What I don’t agree with is encouraging a woman who being abused by her husband to stay with him and endure beating after beating and continue praying and never consider leaving. People that offer that kind of advice to people have no heart whatsoever. If it was your daughter or a member of your own family on the receiving end of blows from her husband, I don’t believe you would encourage her to stay there and continue to receive abuse. You would likely go there and pick her up yourself.

      The people who are being abused can very well end up DYING and leaving their children with no mother. If not to that extreme, the children may see their mother being hurt by their father and this can start a vicious cycle in children who are moulded by what they see. I’m not married so I may not understand how it is but what I do know is that either as a married person or a single person, every one has the right to live without fear of being harmed or hurt by someone that is meant to love them. If anything or anyone is challenging that right, I believe you need to leave, for the sake of your life and your safety.

      Is a person that can lay their hand on you worth dying for? Definitely not. Jesus did however already die for that person so get yourself safe and pray that God will change them. You can’t change them and staying to receive beatings will definitely not change them. God is the only one that can change someone anyway.

      That’s my two pence. I find it so sad to hear a woman stayed with an abusive husband to “make it work”. From the first time he hit you, making it work shouldn’t be what you were thinking. Saving your life should be what you are thinking. A quick Google search will show how serious this has become.

      http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2012/may/22/domestic-violence-west-africa-irc

      Until Next Time

      Memoirs of a Yoruba Girl

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      I’m Inspired, Now Its Your Turn

      Hey hey

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      I’m sure you’ve heard plenty of motivational talks in your lifetime and I don’t by any means consider myself a motivational speaker. However I would like to share some words of wisdom I (try to) live by.

      1. Life is short, do what you love – this is something I am working on personally. It doesn’t mean you have to make money off of it, if you are passionate about it (and it’s legal) I say go for it. Even if it’s weird. The worst that can happen is that you fail. If you fail, you won’t die.
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      2.Yesterday is gone, tomorrow is not yet here, all you have is now – it’s time to let go of the past. The regrets we wish we could rewind and change. The opportunities we wish we took. The grades we wish we got. The people we wish we met. I think we can be complacent because we feel we have loads of time. A big big wake up call is that people your age and younger than you pass on all the time. Everyday is a gift and tomorrow isn’t promised. Don’t leave till tomorrow what you can do today.

      3. If you never ask, you never get – the worst thing that can happen if you ask is that a person says no or a place turns you down. You may even find they say yes. But the answer will always be a definite no if you never ask.

      4. The worst thing that can happen is that you fail….You won’t die.

      5. Life gets exciting when you challenge yourself and step outside of your comfort zone.

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      6. Sometimes you have to motivate yourself and then motivate yourself again – sometimes people may just not see what you see so can’t support what your doing. You may have to be your own cheerleader sometimes.

      7. God meets us at the point of taking action – we pray and then we act. “Faith without works is dead”. That means if its in God’s will and you’ve prayed it through, step out and God will meet you there as you take action.

      8. The people we look up to, the products we can’t live without all came from someone taking a step out of their comfort zone – who knows what you have to offer the world?

      9. Procrastination steals from you and can eventually kill you – procrastination is an enemy because it steals your time. Time is priceless because you can never get it back …. Ever.

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      I hope these thoughts have encouraged you to step out and make this the year you change your life. I’ll come back and check these when I get demotivated and I hope you’ll do the same.

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      Until Next Time
      Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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