Monthly Archives: January 2016

I will never comb my hair again πŸ™ŒπŸ™ŒπŸ™Œ

Hi all

As the title states, it’s been a while since I combed my hair last πŸ˜…. Quite a long while. I am not attempting to loc my hair and become an “onirun dada” (also known as Rastafarian).

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I fiercely resisted giving up the comb for a long time. A really long time. I used to think people that didn’t comb their hair were crazy. It was also a bit of laziness on my part because my previous experiences with finger detangling took forever (as if natural hair doesn’t take long enough already).

I kept realising however I was always dealing with split ends. It was extremely frustrating. I played wth the idea of shaving everything off and starting again. Then I realised I didn’t think my face could carry that style and I quickly changed my mind.

I FINALLY realised that my hair craves being handled gently, so I had to bite the bullet and give up combs. Suprisingly it has not been that bad.

It is still early days but I would say I am retaining a bit more length and I’m seeing the dreaded split ends a bit less. Please also note I have become friends with the scissors and have done more trimming/dusting than I had done previously. I don’t think I will leave combs forever, depends on how this “experiment” goes.

If you have 4c hair like me, maybe finger detangling is for you too! ✌

Until next time
Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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Jollof Rice – The Origins

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Jollof Rice is hands down THE most popular West African rice dish for a number of reasons. It is a delicious tomato, bell pepper, onion and scotch bonnet based rice dish. It can be served with a number of equally delicous sides including chicken, fish, fried plantain. I think Jollof rice is always best washed down with a chilled bottle of supermalt.

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West Africans will know well that the origins of jollof Rice is hotly debated, especially between Nigerians and Ghanaians.

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Personally being of the Nigerian variety (Yoruba to be precise πŸ˜‰) I think Nigerian Jollof is obviously the best. I’m sure

Jollof however is not an indigenous Nigerian name (at least not a Yoruba name) which would cause me to conclude it was not originally a Nigerian dish.

A little bit of research on the name Jollof  reveals it is related to The Wolof people who are an ethnic group in Senegal, The Gambia, and Mauritania. The term Wolof also refers to the Wolof language and to their states, cultures, and traditions. Older French publications frequently employ the spelling “Ouolof“; up to the 19th century, the spellings “Volof” and “Olof” are also encountered. In English, Wollof and Woloff are found, particularly in reference to the Gambian Wolof. (The spelling “Wollof” is closer to the native pronunciation of the name.) The spelling Jolof is often used, but in particular reference to the Wolof empire and kingdom in central Senegal that existed from the 14th to the 19th centuries.

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So Jollof rice does not indigenously belong to either Nigerians or Ghanaians but actually the Wolof people of Gambia or Senegal. We can conclude and agree that although Nigerians are not the originators of Jollof Rice, they are instrumental in the perfecting of the dish πŸ˜ƒ.

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Until next time
Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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