Monthly Archives: January 2015

What is African Time?

Hi everyone, hope this post meets you well.

Wanted to touch on a very sensitive and controversial issue. Africans alike know it as African time, Caribbeans know it as Black man time (I believe) and I’ve heard Indians refer to it as Indian time. All the terms are a nice way to refer to the fact the we as Africans and Black people in general are intentionally late for events and have a overly relaxed attitude to punctuality.

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It’s such a legitimate term it has its own dedicated Wikipedia page! “African time (or Africa time) is the perceived cultural tendency, in most parts of Africa, toward a more relaxed attitude to time. This is sometimes used in a pejorative sense, about tardiness in appointments, meetings and events. This also includes the more leisurely, relaxed, and less rigorously-scheduled lifestyle found in African countries, especially as opposed to the more clock-bound pace of daily life in Western countries. As such, it is similar to time orientations in some other non-Western culture regions”. (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_time)

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The first place I noticed this was at African weddings and big scale functions. The invitation will state a certain time and nobody gets there at the stated time, even the celebrants! For example, a 50th birthday party is scheduled to start at 6pm. Guests may not properly begin to arrive until 7:30pm. The celebrant may be fashionably late and arrive at 8pm or 8:30pm.

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Unfortunately what can happen is this “African time” mentality infiltrates all other areas of your life. Which translates to you just scraping being on time to work, school, college, university, church or interviews. It can mean you miss trains and buses you could have easily otherwise caught. It translates to you arriving late to parties and potentially your own wedding!

I think the conclusion of the matter is discipline! (Admittedly I’m still working on this myself!)

Until Next Time
Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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The Infamous Gele

Hey everyone

This post is dedicated the the beautiful cultural piece of the amazing Yoruba people named the gele.

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The gele is rooted in Nigerian and Yoruba culture. Gele is a Yoruba word that means head tie and is known as “ichafu” in Igbo.

I originally thought the gele was a Yoruba phenomenon, but a little research actually showed the act of tying a headscarf in this way is a West African phenomenon although most prevalent and flamboyant in the Yoruba Land.

Geles can be achieved from a range of fabrics such as Aso Oke, Sego/Zego fabrics, Damask, Jubilee, Swiss, embroidered, Singele (net gele), French lace

An interesting piece I read about the gele is that in times past, your age determined the direction in which you tied your gele. A forward facing gele was meant for young people who had their futures in front of them. A sideward facing gele was meant for a woman in her prime of life. A backward facing gele was for the lady who had lived her life.

I’ve included above a link to a song that has become synonymous with the Yoruba gele. This post wouldn’t be complete without it!

Hope you enjoyed this piece
Until next time

MemoirsOfAYorubaGirl
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You need some honey in your life! ASAP!

Happy New year! I would just like to take this time to thank you for visiting today and every other time. I hope this post meets you well and I pray you will have an amazing year!

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This blog post is dedicated to honey. I have been so astounded by how well it works, I had to share how I felt with someone! I have been using honey to cleanse my face for the last two months or so. It is hands down the best facial cleaner I have EVER used! It is amazing because it really cleanses your face without leaving your skin feeling stripped. It is very mild but works. I can attest to this fact after not having any (or significantly less) t zone spots since around when I started using honey. BTW I would normally get t zone spots once every week or two weeks.

At present, I use honey once a day, in the morning. I apply and massage it into my face and let it sit while I shower. After I finish, I rinse it with very lukewarm water and voila! I’ll then moisturise etc as usual.
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As you may or may not know I favour natural products. I have used Ose Dudu osun (which actually contains honey!) for the longest time to bathe and wash my face (I reviewed it here! http://wp.me/p2a4MJ-2F ). I was happy and I still use it to bathe but I was aware the Ose Dudu Osun was really drying my face out. I had tried a number of other facial cleansers that I felt they were still drying out my face and leaving it too tight.

A post or something out of a book by Dephne Madyra (check her out on YouTube) is what prompted my decision to try some honey.

Honey gently removes dirt and impurities without stripping the skin of natural oils. Foaming cleansers and soaps frequently strip the skin of these protective oils and cause the skin to overproduce oil.
The natural antibacterial and probiotic properties of raw honey effectively reduce breakouts and prevent new acne. It balances oily skin and moisturizes dry skin. (http://empoweredsustenance.com/wash-face-with-honey/)

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I stand by this as being the best ever facial cleaner I have EVER used! I hope you will feel the same.

Until next time
Memoirs Of A Yoruba Girl
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